Dealing with the Travel Jitters

 

For my trip to South East Asia, I went though the Travel Jitters for about six months. It wasn’t that I didn’t want to travel anymore, but I didn’t want to make the wrong choice in leaving my life behind. It had a lot to do with what was going on in my personal or work life day to day. But, over time, I knew if I didn’t get on that plane, I would look in the mirror some day and see that my own fear of the unknown defeated me. I spoke to countless people from generations above me and the resounding answer was they wished they had traveled more when they were young, or they absolutely loved their time traveling and wouldn’t give up the memories or friendships they created along the way for anything.

Overanalyzing the details is completely normal. Typically analyzing all the things that could go wrong, and assuming you will eventually wish you hadn’t left your life at home. I have yet to meet someone in any age group who regrets traveling for an extended period of time. I will not say it’s always easy, as traveling has its hardships, but I assure you that it’s not only the path to foreign discovery, but to self. The best way to find out who you are is to get out of your familiar space and explore. At home it is much more difficult to find the same stimulation that will automatically bombard you while traveling in the way of smells, sights, sounds, history, architecture and lifestyle. With all these senses firing, you will gain a much broader outlook of the world and, as a result, yourself.

Knowing who you are will allow you to choose a path that will ultimately make you a happier person. Maybe you will realize leaving you past job is what you want to do for the rest of your life after traveling for a while. Maybe you’ll leave that job and be completely disgusted by the thought of it. What’s important is that you questioned it and traveling has given you a clear view on life and the confidence in knowing who you truly are.

As Confucius said, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” That first step is deciding to travel. Once that step is taken, the hardest part is over…I promise.

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